Solo Traveler – Find the Perfect RV 4091

Have you considered hitting the road in a motorhome or travel trailer, but you’re just too intimidated by going it alone? There are thousands of “solo travelers” that have thrown their inhibitions aside and jumped into RVing with both feet and we want you to become one! That’s why Camping World has put together a series of articles to encourage those who want to travel but haven’t quite figured out how to do it alone.

Today we’ll look RV floorplans for the solo traveler. Join us and find the perfect RV for you!

All RV owners have gone through the same process of narrowing down which types of RVs would fit their lifestyles: a motorized vehicle or pulling a trailer. Let’s break down the pros and cons for you:

Motorhomes

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A motorized RV or motorhome has an engine in it that needs to be maintained, just like a car. So, if you are planning on bringing a car (a toad) along behind the motorhome you’ll have two vehicles to maintain.

Motorhomes come in three classes (or types): Class A (large ‘bus’), Class B (small van) and Class C (usually has a bed over the cab).  They can also be designated by gasoline or diesel fuel engines.

As a solo traveler I like the idea that if I feel unsafe, I don’t have to get out of my vehicle and hook up a trailer to leave. I can hop in the driver’s seat and just drive away. Most motorhomes have their own built-in generators, providing options for charging the batteries in your camper. Class A’s and C’s normally have more storage than travel trailers.

Trailers or Towables

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Trailers come in a couple of different versions: travel trailers (pull behind), fifth-wheels (front end sits over the bed of the towing truck), teardrop campers (small low profile with interior bed), and pop-up trailers. These are all also referred to as towables.

All of these trailers are pulled by a large vehicle, usually a truck. As a solo traveler, you will have to decide if you can become comfortable hitching and unhitching your trailer whenever you camp. With back-up cameras, the chore is a little more manageable these days.

Sometimes trailers do not come with a generator.  However, you can purchase a mobile generator and attach it to the trailer, if you feel one is needed.

Lifestyle to Consider

There are several things to take into consideration when buying your RV that only you can decide. Here are some things to think about:

  • Check water tank sizes, especially if you plan on boondocking (fresh, gray and black water)
  • Look at different lengths of trailers and motorhomes to see what you are comfortable with on the road
  • Do you need a bath in your RV or will you be using campground baths and showers?
  • Are you planning to park your camper in one place and use the truck or a toad to drive around? You may want to consider what kind of mileage your day trip vehicle gets. For example, if you will be driving a big dually that gets 10 mpg, you may want to consider pulling a toad that gets 30 mpg if you spend more time on day trips and less time driving the RV to destinations.
  • Do you need more than one sleeping area for visitors or family to camp with you?
  • Where do you plan to spend most of your time? If it is in national park campgrounds, there is an average maximum length of 27’ for RVs.
  • Do you like to cook? Then a teardrop or pop-up camper might not be for you. Teardrops sometimes have a kitchen outside with a cooler and a hot plate. Pop-ups usually have a propane stove and sometimes a sink. However, neither offers many kitchen amenities.
  • Will you be spending a lot of time indoors working or entertaining? Figure a floor plan with living area space into your decision.
  • If you will be using your RV frequently or plan to live in it, you may want to consider only those with larger refrigerators and freezers.
  • Do you want to stay off the grid and boondock for a substantial amount of time? Look at campers that have the capability to add solar panels to their roofs and space for extra batteries.
  • If you plan on camping frequently in cold weather, you may want to look at Class A motorhomes. Their tanks and pipes are usually located in an insulated “basement” that helps to keep them warm. If you’re set on a towable, you can put skirting along the bottom of any type RV and heat with a lightbulb, propane heater, or another source.

Sample Floor Plans

Here’s a look at some of the modern floor plans so you can get an idea as to what’s out there. A good place to see multiple ones is at Camping World’s website.

Class C – Thor Freedom Elite 26HE

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Note the four different sleeping areas in this Class C.  It also has a slide, which gives you more floor space.  You can look at pictures of the interior here.

Travel Trailer Pull Behind – Keystone Cougar 25 BHSWE

Photo Tripping America - Find the Perfect RV - Camping World

Note that this pull-behind has four possible sleeping areas, an outdoor kitchen, a slide for the dinette and a large bathroom. You can look at the interior here.

Class B – Hymer Sunlight V2

Photo Tripping America - Find the Perfect RV - Camping WorldNote this Class B has two twin beds that can be converted into one large bed, and that space can be used as a dining/entertainment area during the day. You can see pictures of the interior here.

Make Lists

There are so many configurations to choose from. My suggestion is to come up with a list of “must-haves” and a list of “I can compromise” features after considering how, when, and where you will use your RV. Then peruse the Camping World website to see what is available. Before you know it, you’ll be driving an RV tailored just for you!


Have you found the RV of your dreams? What do you camp in? Leave a comment below!

Today, we’ll look RV floorplans for the solo traveler. All RV owners have gone through the same process of narrowing down which types of RVs would fit their lifestyles: a motorized vehicle or pulling a trailer. Let’s break down the pros and cons for each to find the perfect fit for your solo travels. #solotravel #solotraveler #rving #rvlife #camper #camping #camperlife #happycamper

Shelley Dennis Contributor
Shelley Dennis is a travel photographer and writer who threw caution to the wind and gave up most of her belongings to travel the country in an RV. Her trusty sidekick for this lifetime adventure is her Golden Retriever, Sully. You can find them both at www.PhotoTrippingAmerica.com

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