5 Tips for Music Festival RV Camping 1164

Music and camping can be two of the greatest things. Large music festivals are often undertaken with a tent, but many of them allow RVs and even have a special area for RVs. If you’re interested in attending one of the festivals but don’t want to do the whole tent camping thing, I totally get it.

RVing at a music festival an make the whole experience a lot better. With that in mind, here a few tips to make RVing a music festival as fun and comfortable as possible.

1. Make Sure The Music Festival Is RV-Friendly

Audience with hands in the air at a music festival
Image from Getty

Not all music festivals are. If they aren’t, there should be a note on the festival’s website. Generally, the ones right in the heart of a big city are going to be less RV-friendly, whereas festivals in an area with a little more room will have RV accommodations.

It really all depends on the location of the festival and the type of music festival it is. If you can’t find that information on the festival’s website, get a number for the organizers and call. Someone there should be able to give you a clear answer. Another option is to look and see what people did last year. You can look up social media posts, youtube videos, blogs, and more about whatever festival you’re trying to go to. From there it’s a simple matter of identifying if the festival is RV-friendly and if so how to make the most of it.

2. Reach Out Ahead of Time to Get Details and Rules

Don’t just pay for things and show up. You should do your best to get as much information about the festival as possible. You want to know where you will be parking your RV in relation to the rest of the festival, how far it is to bathrooms, food, water, and the stage or stages.

While much of this information will be found on the festival’s website, I still highly recommend calling ahead to see if there’s anything else you need to know other than what’s on the website. If you can, another thing I suggest is going with someone who has already gone to that particular music festival. This way you’ll have a somewhat experienced person who can show you the ropes and help you get to where you want to be. Plus it’s always fun to go to these festivals with friends.

3. Gear Up Properly and Bring Food and Water

Four delicious sausages cooked to perfection on the traditional charcoal barbecue fiery grill. This scene on a camping road trip to the mountains. A typical Summer image when camping, travelling or having parties with family and friends.
Image from Getty

Camping in an RV at a music festival can be different than camping at a traditional campground. Oftentimes you’ll be boondocking, so keep this in mind. You’ll want to have a generator, solar panels (if possible), and anything else you need to go boondocking. If you have a full hook-up spot, it’s still a good idea to plan like you’re boondocking. There can always be a mix-up and you could end up without a power hook-up or sewer service.

Additionally, I’d say to bring plenty of potable water. Yes, you’ll often be able to find some at the festival, but it’ll be cheaper if you bring it along. Also, you’re going to be outside. This means you need to be ready for bugs, rain, excessive sun, heat, and anything else you might run across. This means dressing appropriately and having things like bug spray and sunscreen on hand.

Also, come prepared on the food side of things. There’s likely food around to purchase, but you’ll save a ton if you grill for yourself or eat-in. It’s also a good way to make sure you still eat right while at the festival. I’m all for indulging a little bit in festival food, but coming with food of your own will help ensure not everything you eat while you’re there is deep-fried or otherwise unhealthy.

4. Don’t Bring Restricted Items

Or really anything that you know you’re not allowed to bring. If there’s anything that’s questionable, just don’t. The last thing you want is to get kicked out of the festival or run into issues with the law.

When inquiring about the details and rules for camping at the festival, you should get a list of things you can and cannot bring. Every festival is different so don’t make any assumptions. Typically, though, weapons, fireworks, and other possibly dangerous items are forbidden.

5. Get There Early and Don’t be in a Big Rush to Leave

RV Caravans Storage. Parking Space For Recreational Vehicles.
Image from Getty

You want to give yourself plenty of time, so try to get to the festival early. This will allow you to get fully situated before things kick into gear. Find out what time you can get there at the earliest and then plan around that. You don’t have to and probably don’t want to be the first one there, but getting there before things get crazy is always smart.

A lot of people hit the road quickly after a music festival. This honestly isn’t super smart if you’re camping in an RV. Trying to make the rush of everyone leaving is stressful, and it usually still takes a long time. Go with the expectation that you’re going to hang out for a while.

You have your RV right there, so it shouldn’t be a problem to chill-out right at the end of the festival. Take a quick nap, read a book, watch some TV, surf the internet, or play some video games. Just do something to take up some time. Let the folks who are rushing out of there do so. You can leave after that initial rush and do so comfortably.

The only exception here is if the festival organizers are asking you to clear out by a certain time. If that’s the case, follow instructions and try to leave in a timely manner. Still, don’t rush. Rushing will only lead to issues and accidents. You want the end of the music festival to be as enjoyable as any other part.


Do you have any additional tips for RVing at a music festival? Leave a comment below!

5 tips for music festival RV camping

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